Rather than rely on purely subjective feelings, a variety of readings were taken and the results compared with the results of a triathlete undergoing the same programme.

End of
Week
Resting
Pulse Rate
Maximum
Pulse Rate
Recovery Time
(mins:secs)
Maximum Endurance
(miles - max set.)
0 86 168 4:40 5
1 84 164 4:00 6.5
2 84 152 3:32 8
3 78 144 3:01 10.5

These results show a regular decrease in pulse rate and corresponding decrease in recovery times throughout the period. Equally important is the maximum endurance test. The overall result is a noticeable increase in endurance.

The tests for maximum aerobic power, V02 max and lactate levels were done in co-operation with www.theendurancecoach.com and compared results from a triathlete taking the same course. Both maximum aerobic power and V02 max provide useful indications of the body's ability to take in, transport and process oxygen. Essentially, the higher the figures, the better a human can cope with oxygen reduction experienced at altitude.

High lactate levels are an indication of the level of fatigue, and are primarily responsible for cramp through exhaustion.



- Triathlete aerobic and lactate levels (average)

Test Max
Aerobic Power
V02 max
Ml/Kg/min
Average lactate take at
3,6,9 mins
1 pre-training 300 73.8 4.2mmol
2 post-training 330 82.9 2.7mmol


- Trekker/Mountaineer aerobic and lactate levels (average)

Test Max
Aerobic Power
V02 max
Ml/Kg/min
Average lactate take at
3,6,9 mins
1 pre-training 260 67.4 6.0mmol
2 post-training 330 84.9 3.8mmol

Conclusion



Both tests show a marked improvement in performance and endurance at sea level. The increased maximum aerobic power and V02 max should have a pronounced impact on the ability to cope with altitude. Studies have shown that the full effects of altitude training take effect up to 10 days after the completion of the course.





  • 1) See an improvement after only 3 weeks
  • 2) Maintain your core fitness
  • 3) Improve recovery time
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